1000ordi.ch online

One of the stores I use to buy hard disks, memory and so on, is 1000ordi.ch. But, they are my *second* choice for one major reason.

Look at a partial listing of some Apple memory they sell. The price is not important, but the little colored bullets are.

screen-shot-2017-01-30-at-13-35-16

Upon first glance, I see a green bullet and a red bullet and I think “they’re using the stoplight metaphor! Green must mean ‘in stock’ and red must mean ‘out of stock.'”

But, you’d be wrong. The first time I went to their site, I found what I wanted, it had a green bullet, I ordered it and drove to the store.

“We don’t have that in stock. It’s on order.”

“But, I saw it had a green bullet! How could it be out of stock?”

“Green means we can get it in 24-48 hours.”

“What?!?”

“Green with a checkmark means it’s in stock.”

You’ve got to be kidding me. But, sure enough, this is how they do their site:

screen-shot-2017-01-30-at-13-44-02

UI and UX matter. If you are going to use an existing metaphor, you *cannot* deviate from it. If you’re going to use a new metaphor, it has to be provide something materially better than the old one, or else you will just confuse or infuriate customers.

As a result, I only shop here when their competitor doesn’t have what I need in stock.

 

Moving Abroad? Sell your printer.

I’m fuming. I can’t believe this has happened and the company reps are either too stupid to know or don’t have the balls to ‘fess up.

A client of mine gave me a Canon PIXMA MX-347 printer they no longer used because they had upgraded. I tested it out, seemed fine but the ink was low. No matter.

Last month, a friend said they needed a printer. “I have one I can sell you.” So, I did my checks. Went online to find replacement cartridges. Determined that the currently installed 810/811 XL were no longer produced, but the 510/511 were the ones *for this printer*.

original

Went to the store, bought the two cartridges, installed them, and… “Check ink U140”

Back to Google. Researched, read, posted, asked, tried every “trick” to reset the printer, cleaned the heads, blah, blah, blah.

Contacted Canon Support Forums, Canon Facebook page, email, etc.

Today’s response: “That’s a model for the Asian market. We here in Switzerland don’t know anything about it.”

Give me a break. The box says it’s compatible with the MX340 series, which clearly the MX347 is part of. I replied to them “certainly the fact that it’s from Asia has no bearing on the ink, right?” Because that would just be anti-consumer.

More Googling. Yup, the printer companies region code their cartridges. Of course, you only find this out after you’ve bought the new cartridges, opened the box, installed them and… oh, now you can’t return them. Brilliant.

So, if you’re moving. Be sure to sell your printer first. Because otherwise, once the ink runs out in the new country (or if they dry up during the move), you’ll be stuck with an ugly paper weight.

HP, Canon, Xerox, Lexmark, Epson – this is a really shitty thing you’re doing. It’s not for the consumer. There is no protection. There is no “better for the customer.” It’s you deliberately being assholes so that we, the customers, are forced to buy/sell your products.

I know that many people in this world don’t move around that much, or not that far. But, there are a fair few who do. And you have deliberately designed your business to prey on them.

You are terrible.

 

iPhone Hint: Accessing the Camera from the Lock Screen

Recently, I was watching a performance and noticed a woman in the row in front of me taking photos from time to time with her iPhone. Each time she wanted to take a picture, she:

  1. Pressed the on/off button to show the Lock Screen.
  2. “Slide to unlock”
  3. Typed in her 4-digit code
  4. Found the screen with the Camera app (as it was not in the permanent bottom row)
  5. Clicked the Camera app
  6. Took her picture.

All of this took several seconds and I could tell that often she had missed the picture she wanted to takeIMG_4133. Some time ago, Apple recognized the benefit of quickly accessing the Camera app, so they have created a shortcut, starting from the Lock Screen:

  1. Press the on/off button to show the Lock Screen.
  2. Press and swipe up the Camera app icon in the bottom right corner. (see image)
  3. Take the picture.

This procedure takes only seconds because it does not require the passcode nor all those steps. This means that even someone who doesn’t know your passcode can take pictures, like at a family gathering and your phone is on the table in the kitchen but you’re outside playing and the perfect photo opportunity presents itself.

For the security minded, the iPhone will *not* let you look at the full Camera roll of the phone, only the pictures that were taking using this method, this time. This means, if you use this method and take two pictures and then the phone turns off again, when you use the method again, you will not have access to those two photos without the passcode.

iPhone 6: Slow Motion (slo-mo)!

When I got my new iPhone 6 in October, I was merely trying to get a new iPhone because my old 4s was in such a sorry state that it was becoming unreliable and therefore unusable.

After the ordering and waiting fiasco I’ve written about earlier, it finally arrived and I was excited and couldn’t wait to having a working device. I went through the set-up, entered my Apple ID, sync’d it from backup and voilà! I was back in business.

I had a look at all the new apps, the new look to the old apps, and played around with everything little by little, day by day, app by app. Naturally, it was such a big update, that I didn’t discover everything immediately.

One thing I stumbled on fairly early was something I had never even heard mentioned before but was more exciting for me than anything else I’ve seen on the iPhone: slo-mo!

We were dog sitting during the late summer, went biking at a local park with a pond. At the end of our bike ride, we were in the gravel parking lot. I had shown my son how to skid the back wheel and he was practicing. I thought I’d get a video of it.

iPhone > slide up for Camera > landscape mode > scroll from Photo to Video and then….Slo-Mo! What’s this?!?!

I took the video and he skidded two feet away from me. We watched the video and saw the gravel flying up and it was simply beautiful!!! I was ecstatic! It was so easy, so awesome, so cool!

Needless to say, I’ve been taking slow motion videos of everything I can think of since then: eggs breaking, water balloon breaking, hitting a baseball, driving through a puddle, breaking big pieces of ice on a frozen lake, dogs running and playing, swans landing….Every day, I think – ooh! That would be so much fun to see in slow motion!

If you haven’t discovered it, try it out! You’ll be amazed.

iPhone 6 pre-order with Swisscom: follow-up

In my previous post about ordering the new iPhone 6 with Swisscom, I expressed my disappointment with the ordering process: how ill-prepared Swisscom was for the surge of orders, despite having a history of record sales, etc.

I did complete my order the next morning, but I asked the question: where am I on the ordered list of clients who will receive their phones? Did those 7 hours cost me 2-3 weeks or were they inconsequential?

I received an email from Swisscom later that day with details about my order, including a link to track the status of my order. Naturally, I clicked the link immediately to see what it said. For the first few days, it just said “Your phone will be delivered to the address you provided” and not much else.

A few days later, I saw “Expected delivery date: 03 October 2014” Whoo-hoo! That’s awesome. I can wait that long. Oh, happy days!

On 01 October 2014, I clicked again (I had checked several times in between, as well), to see if the phone had been sent so that it could arrive on the expected day. And I saw, “Delivery date: unknown”

WTF? It is simply unprofessional to say one date and then take it back. It’s not that hard to see how many were ordered, how many units you received from Apple and do the calculation. If you can’t do it, then don’t put an expected delivery date!!! This is the most unprofessional, frustrating pre-order system I’ve seen and I’m none to happy about it.

Today, I’ll go to a Swisscom store directly and see how easy it is to get an iPhone 6. I know others have theirs, so I’m curious why I don’t have one and why I have no idea when I will have one. Will it be days? Weeks? Months?

Why did I spend over two hours on Swisscom’s faulty, poorly designed pre-order page that wasn’t able to handle the traffic that they should have anticipated 6 months in advance? What is the point of pre-ordering if that doesn’t gain me anything in terms of receiving my unit faster than going to a store?

My Unpleasant Experience Ordering the iPhone 6 at Swisscom Last Night

When the iPhone 6 was announced, I was excited, especially because my faithful iPhone 4S is becoming more and more  flakey. It’s time, so I was ready for the announcement, even more so when I saw the specs and so on. So, I was ready to upgrade.

I’m with Swisscom, so I went to their site and filled in the form to be informed when the Pre-Order would happen. I also made sure that my account was up-to-date, invoice-wise. Yup, all good.

Yesterday, 18 September 2014 at 16.17, I got the email that the Pre-Order would start “on Friday 19 September at 12.01 midnight” and there was a link “Click here to Pre-Order.” Naturally, I clicked immediately and saw this screen:

Screen Shot 2014-09-19 at 00.02.14

Sweet! I’ve got the landing page, and so at 23:59, I’ll load that page and start refreshing. Which I did. On two computers.

But, for the next 30-40 minutes, constant refreshes got me nowhere. That page never changed. Eventually I started tweeting and reading others tweets, and clearly people were also stuck on that page and couldn’t order. I don’t know if they had the same screen as I did, but there were lots of complaints by excited, but tired people. But some responses from Swisscom indicated that the pages for ordering were actually online, but they were experiencing some technical difficulties.

Being the geek that I am, I started trying other options….searching for “iPhone 6” from the Swisscom main page, going through their “Mobile > All Phones” menu option (but it still listed only 5c and 5s), logging in and trying to “Extend your subscription” and so on. For over an hour, I got nowhere. And many others had similar problems.

All the while, we got tweets from @Swisscom_Care and @Swisscom_de saying that the servers were experiencing unforeseen high demand. WHAT!? Unforeseen?! They’ve been selling iPhones since 2008! New iPhone releases have set records for pre-orders almost every single time. So, how can they say with a straight face that they weren’t ready for the demand. I think that, more than anything, is what upset me last night. I can understand technical problems. I cannot understand, and cannot accept, the largest ISP in Switzerland – with years of experience selling (or allowing pre-orders for) iPhones on release day – not having the capacity to meet the demand for pre-orders. Inexcusable, because it was foreseeable.

I actually changed the language of the pages I was on to see if different languages had different numbers of connections, thereby affecting speed. It felt like it helped, but it might have just been luck.

I finally got to a page to select the Color (space grey, gold, silver), Model (iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus) and the Capacity (16, 64 or 128 GB), but it was immediately covered by a “please wait” message. I got into that mode I used back in high school to call radio stations to win tickets. Dial, listen, hang up, redial, etc. Refresh, see result, Refresh…..

Finally, I accidentally clicked on the Capacity drop down and it worked. Even though the “please wait” message was still there. OK. I rolled with it.

Next page asked me if I wanted to extend my subscription, start a new one, transfer a number from another provider, etc. Except, I wasn’t able to extend my subscription. Told me I’d have to call. I clicked on my Account and saw that they hadn’t marked my last invoice as paid. I checked my bank, yup, it was paid two days ago. Grrrr! I called – 30 minutes of waiting before I accidentally hung up and didn’t bother to call back.

I selected some available option and made it through to the next page: Do you want insurance for a year? Nope. Next page. Hang. It just sat there. For about 15-20 minutes. So I stopped it and started again.

I started and got stuck, and started and got further and got stuck for at least another hour or so. On the bright side, somewhere along the way, the system did allow me to select the “extend your subscription” option, but I never could pre-order the phone. I crawled into bed around 02:30, cursing such a terrible experience.

I woke up in the morning to meet my son before school. As I rubbed my eyes, I loaded the page, and again 2-3 times, I was stuck in the same place. But, then…..!

Selected the phone. Check. Selected the contract. Check. No insurance. Check. Checkout. Check! Your order has been accepted!!!! CHECK CHECK CHECK CHECK!!!!

“This product is not in stock.” Ugh. Yes, I know that everyone received that, but don’t the people at Swisscom know there’s a better way to say it? “Deliveries will begin on 26 September 2014. Orders will be filled in the order they were received.” And so on.

I’m happy I’m getting a new iPhone, but no thanks to Swisscom. A company that big needs to be better prepared and all the Customer Service Reps in the world saying “Sorry, we’re experience unforeseen high demand” won’t change that.

Coming Soon: Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Program

Apple’s current operating system is called Mac OS X Mavericks, also known as 10.9. But, they are working on the next version, code named Mac OS X Yosemite, which is due out this fall, according to Apple’s site.

They have just announced a Beta Program that people can participate in. They are looking for 1 million beta users to help shape the final product or to find problems.

Want to join the Beta Program? I did.

 

iMac internal microphone problems – another solution

I’ve replaced the hard disk in numerous iMacs over the years. It’s a fairly straight-forward repair, although not for everyone. But, in 2-3 cases recently, I would replace the disk, re-install the Mac OS X, restore all user data from the old disk (or a Time Machine backup), and return the computer to the user only to have them call me back in the following days, saying “The microphone doesn’t work.”

I would think to myself, “Oh, I must have missed a cable when I was mucking about inside” and I’d tell the client the same. But, time and time again, that wasn’t it.

Google to the rescue. I found many people with the same problem. And many “this worked for me” replies. Some people said, “Hit it like the Fonz.” Others suggested resetting the PRAM. I tried every suggestion I could find, but to no end. I did learn that people couldn’t be heard on Skype when speaking with a normal voice, but if they spoke REALLY LOUDLY, the other party could barely hear what was being said.

Now, I was really anxious, nervous and worried about the work I had done. Had I done something that broke the microphone? Was the design of the iMac such that merely opening the case could damage the microphone?

I realized at one point that the LED flashlight that I would use to prop up the screen from the case had a magnet on the bottom. Did that come into contact with the microphone and damage it?

I tried and tried and tried to find a solution, but could find none. So, I had to give back the computer with no working microphone and apologise profusely and promise to keep looking.

This happened last year. And again this year. And then with an iMac that a client let me keep since they had moved to a MacBook Pro. I was getting to the point that I was nervous whenever someone called me with an iMac problem, just in case I had to replace the disk.

Well, it happened again. But, this time, I was paying attention. Before doing any work, I turned it on, using my own boot disk, logged in and verified that the internal microphone did work. Check.

I went through the repair: turn it off, unplug everything, carefully disassemble the iMac, replace the hard disk, re-assemble, boot (“standard Apple chime” – yay!), install Mac OS X (while waiting, I put little labels with the client’s name on the old disk and on the top of the iMac), log-in, test the webcam and microphone, and ….no sound. Same damn result.

But…. I was so careful! I painstakingly went over every step. Took it apart again. Confirmed that the cables that I touched/detached were 1) not related to the microphone and 2) reattached. I look closer at the webcam/microphone assembly. Found out they were separate. I removed the webcam assembly and saw the microphone attached behind it. A little round metal piece firmly secured to the top and with two thin wires snaking around and behind other bigger devices in the iMac case. In other words, in order to damage this, you’d really have to make an effort. Which left me really dumbfounded.

I’m not sure why I did it, but I looked up the original (“Welcome to your new iMac”) documentation that Apple included with the iMac I was working on. I found it out there somewhere. The manual pointed very specifically to the various devices: iSight camera, iSight camera “On Air” indicator, ambient light sensor were behind the front panel. The microphone was on the top. Not facing the user, but facing up like the audio version of a Hollywood Klieg light. So, I looked there, to see what I could see.

I saw the little label that I had affixed there to identify whose computer it was, but…. I had put it dead center. Right on top of the microphone. I let out a barbaric yawp and wondered if it could really be this simple. Surely, a little piece of tape would not block the microphone so completely and utterly….would it?

Yes, it did.

I removed the label, turned on the computer, and the microphone was perfect. I did the same on my iMac and its microphone works great, too. Still waiting to hear back from the two clients I had left hanging. But, I’m sure that’s all it is.

If you are dealing with a similar problem with the microphone, please check to make sure that there is no tape, sticky-note, or anything else on the top of the iMac case blocking the microphone. You should be able to easily see where the microphone is.

 

PC Vendors and Windows Gripes: Part 01

This is the first in what will surely be a an ongoing series. Yes, I am a big Apple fan. I have been using their products since 1986. While I have some issues with some of their products and software, the list in no way compares to my list of grievances on the PC/Windows side of things. In many cases, the reason I find it necessary to comment is because at least one other manufacturer does it better/right/smarter, etc.

So, here goes:

1. Incomplete or Useless Information provided

I’m sitting here looking at a client’s HP/Compaq laptop and I’d like to know the size of the hard disk – which failed the internal Hard Disk Diagnostic – so I can tell the client prices for a replacement. I need the size so that I can make sure the replacement is at least as big as the failing one.

I’ve looked in the BIOS information, the 2-3 various Diagnostics screens, and the “System Information” screen available at startup. That information is simply not to be found. I do know the Model Name, the Product Number, Serial Number, Warranty Start Date, Product Configuration ID, BIOS Version, Total Memory, Processor Type and Speed and even the Battery Serial Number (really?!) but nothing at all about the hard disk. Useless!!! The only options are to either actually start Windows and find out there, or to open the system and look at the disk. Incredible!

Many PC and BIOS manufacturers do provide this information, so it’s quite frustrating when one model doesn’t. And I can’t understand why they would omit something so basic, especially since it’s one of the things in a computer which can be replaced so easily.

2. There are no Standard Keys during boot up

Every time I look at a client’s computer, I want to first look at the BIOS. So, what hot key do I use? Delete? Escape? F2? F9? F10? F11? F12? Something with Alt? That IBM/Lenovo blue button? Something else? On many computers, it used to be that during the first few seconds of startup, the various hot keys would be listed, but these days it’s not shown by default.

It would be so nice if all manufacturers could just agree to use the Escape key to interrupt the normal boot sequence and provide an on-screen, textual menu of options (BIOS Setup, System Diagnostics, Boot Device Menu, Create Recovery Disks, etc.). Even better would be that each of those options would have a standard F-key default so those who knew could go straight to the desired menu option without needing the Escape key first.

3. Windows Drive Letters

The fact that Windows continues to use letters to access drives/disks continues to astound me. I don’t care about backwards compatibility with 1985. It used to be that accessing anything beyond F: was not possible without modifying the CONFIG.SYS file (remember that?!), but that self-made problem has apparently been rectified.

But, what about A: and B:? What, you don’t have two floppy drives in your system? Why not? Your BIOS certainly gives you the option to have floppy drives. Wow. So, that’s two wasted drive letters.

Now, I don’t know anyone who will actually use the remaining 24 letters for disk volumes, but that artificial barrier is only there because our alphabet has 26 letters. What if we spoke Rotokas? We’d only have 12 letters, i.e. disk volumes, available.

But, here’s a real world scenario which illustrates the idiocy of this letter-based naming scheme: I had a client call me saying he didn’t think his automatic backup system was working. I had a look and saw that the Backup Job was defined to synchronize files from a directory on C: to a directory on his 1.0 TB external disk E:. It had worked before, but no longer.

So I looked at E:. It was an 8 GB USB key. Oops. Order matters. And that’s just stupid.

It seems that at some point, the client had disconnected the external disk and before reconnecting, he had connected a USB key, which means it was now E: and the external disk was F: So, the backup system failed, because the external drive was no longer E: as previous defined/assumed.

That’s it for now. But, I’m sure I’ll be back with more.